Collecting Optical Art, a guide from Chritie’s.com

 Chosen for  THERESPONSIVEI.COM  by Eva Zanardi  

Collecting Guide: Five Things You Need to Know about Optical Art. Head of First Open/NYC Han-I Wang shares her tips for collecting optical art, from the importance of condition to advice on incorporating these works into your home

Richard Anuszkiewicz (b. 1930), Rainforest, acrylic on canvas; Painted in 1969. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000.

Richard Anuszkiewicz (b. 1930), Rainforest, acrylic on canvas; Painted in 1969. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000.

Wang Guangle (B. 1966), "Untitled"

Wang Guangle (B. 1966), “Untitled”

Victor Vasarely (1906-1997), URU, acrylic on masonite, Painted in 1975. Estimate: $12,000-18,000.

Victor Vasarely (1906-1997), URU, acrylic on masonite, Painted in 1975. Estimate: $12,000-18,000.

Gunther Uecker (b. 1930), Spirale,  oil and nails on canvas mounted on panel; Painted in 1969.  Price realized: $530,500

Gunther Uecker (b. 1930), Spirale, oil and nails on canvas mounted on panel; Painted in 1969. Price realized: $530,500

from Christie’s .com POST-WAR & CONTEMPORARY ART|  EXPERT GUIDES JUNE 25, 2015

1. Do Your Homework: Context is Key

Optical art can be loosely defined as works that convey a sense of three-dimensionality on a two-dimensional plane. In a sense, optical art has been around for centuries. Trompe l’oeil works have been delighting viewers since the Renaissance, but seen in a contemporary context, optical art is often marked by its use of enticing colors and bold, geometric shapes.

While it’s clear that optical art is a market that’s on the move, to understand where it’s going, you have to do a little research on where it’s been. You can chart the trajectory of this market both in terms of artists and collectors. It’s important to know key early artists in this movement—like Victor Vasarely and Günther Förg—and to realize that even though the market was once dominated by European collectors, buyers from the United States have increasingly taken an interest in this category.

2. Take a Closer Look at Condition

While condition is an important factor whenever you’re buying a work of art, it is especially important when acquiring optical art. Optical artists often work with extremely thin layers of paint, meaning that if a work is damaged, it can be more obvious and more difficult to repair. Also, optical artists are known to paint on Masonite or panel, so the quality of the panel is definitely something buyers will want to consider before making a final purchase. Above all, optical art is meant to reflect a certain precision and a pristine condition—or as close to it as you can get—will amplify the overall visual impact of this type of art.

3. Make Home Where the Art Is

One of the most important things to understand about optical art is just how easy it is to live with. With its polished, defined and methodical compositions, optical art isn’t messy or complicated—which makes it easy on the eyes and a great fit for most interiors. It also pairs well with other works—we’d love to see this work next to a Lucio Fontana painting…or as the backdrop to a modern or minimalist sculpture.

4. Understand Where the Market is Going

The market for optical art is only growing and this category is becoming increasingly diverse. Chinese contemporary artists—including Wang Guangle—have begun to incorporate elements of optical art into their work, and other artists from around the world, notably Jesús Rafael Soto have also followed suit.

5. Never Stop Learning

For someone who’s new to this category, there’s a lot to learn, and thankfully, there are some really great resources out there to get you started. Check out Op Art by Frances Follin, Claus Pias and Martina Weinhart, as well as Optical Art: Theory and Practice by Rene Parola. I also love this gorgeous pop-up book if you’re looking for a fun read on op art forerunner Victor Vasarely. While background reading is important, don’t forget that Christie’s specialists are always happy to discuss a particular artist’s market and can also answer any specific questions you may have along the way.

© All artwork on this blog may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles. Please check “fair use rationale” in “About The Responsive I”.

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